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Saint Boltoph's Northfleet Parish Church in County Kent, England

Norfleet Family Genealogy

Merton College, Oxford, the college of Master John de Northflete

 

scendants of Thomas Northfleete

Generation No. 1

 

1. Thomas1 Northfleete was born Abt. 1645 in Kent County, England, and died Abt. 1700 in Nansemond County VA. He married Name Unknown Abt. 1668 in Nansemond County VA.

 

Children of Thomas Northfleete and Name Unknown are:

+ 2 i. Thomas2 Norfleet, born Abt. 1669 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1732 in Nansemond County VA.

+ 3 ii. John Norfleet, born Abt. 1671 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1734 in Nansemond County VA.

+ 4 iii. Christopher Norfleet, born Abt. 1674 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1733 in Nansemond County VA.

+ 5 iv. Edward Norfleet, born Abt. 1676 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1735 in Nansemond County VA.

 

Generation No. 2

 

2. Thomas2 Norfleet (Thomas1 Northfleete) was born Abt. 1669 in Nansemond County VA, and died Abt. 1732 in Nansemond County VA. He married Mary Marmaduke Abt. 1690 in Nansemond County VA.

 

Children of Thomas Norfleet and Mary Marmaduke are:

+ 6 i. Thomas3 Norfleet, born Abt. 1692 in Nansemond County; died Abt. 1746 in Edgecombe County NC.

+ 7 ii. James Norfleet, born Abt. 1694 in Nansemond County VA; died December 1732 in Perquimans Precinct NC.

+ 8 iii. Marmaduke Norfleet, born 1700 in Nansemond County VA; died 1774 in Northampton County NC.

3. John2 Norfleet (Thomas1 Northfleete) was born Abt. 1671 in Nansemond County VA, and died Abt. 1734 in Nansemond County VA. He married Esther _____ Abt. 1694 in Nansemond County VA.

 

Children of John Norfleet and Esther _____ are:

+ 9 i. John3 Norfleet, born 21 July 1699 in Nansemond County VA; died 26 September 1753 in Chowan County NC.

+ 10 ii. Joseph Norfleet, born Abt. 1705 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1756 in Nansemond County VA.

4. Christopher2 Norfleet (Thomas1 Northfleete) was born Abt. 1674 in Nansemond County VA, and died Abt. 1733 in Nansemond County VA. He married Unknown Abt. 1697 in Nansemond County VA.

 

Children of Christopher Norfleet and Unknown are:

+ 11 i. Christopher3 Norfleet, born Abt. 1700 in Nansemond County VA; died 1751.

12 ii. William Norfleet, born Abt. 1710; died Abt. 1770.

5. Edward2 Norfleet (Thomas1 Northfleete) was born Abt. 1676 in Nansemond County VA, and died Abt. 1735 in Nansemond County VA. He married Unknown Abt. 1694.

 

Child of Edward Norfleet and Unknown is:

+ 13 i. Edward3 Norfleet, born Abt. 1695 in Nansemond County VA; died 1747 in Nansemond County VA.

 

Generation No. 3

 

6. Thomas3 Norfleet (Thomas2, Thomas1 Northfleete) was born Abt. 1692 in Nansemond County, and died Abt. 1746 in Edgecombe County NC. He married Ruth Blunt Abt. 1722 in Nansemond County VA, daughter of John Blunt and Ann _____.

 

Children of Thomas Norfleet and Ruth Blunt are:

14 i. Thomas4 Norfleet.

15 ii. Mary Norfleet.

16 iii. Susanna Norfleet.

17 iv. Marmaduke Norfleet, died Abt. 1763 in Halifax County NC.

18 v. Phereby Norfleet, born Abt. 1728 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1798 in Edgecombe County NC. She married Joshua Joseph Bell Abt. 1745 in Edgecombe County NC; died 1793 in Edgecomb County NC.

19 vi. Sarah Norfleet. She married John Young; died 1777 in Halifax County NC.

20 vii. Elizabeth Norfleet. She married James Harris in Halifax County NC.

7. James3 Norfleet (Thomas2, Thomas1 Northfleete) was born Abt. 1694 in Nansemond County VA, and died December 1732 in Perquimans Precinct NC. He married Mary Gordon Abt. 1714 in Nansemond County VA, daughter of John Gordon and Unknown. She was born Abt. 1702, and died 1742 in Perquimans County NC.

 

Children of James Norfleet and Mary Gordon are:

21 i. Mary4 Norfleet, born Abt. 1715.

22 ii. Sarah Norfleet, born Abt. 1716; died Abt. 1745. She married Thomas Parker; died 1762 in Chowan County NC.

23 iii. Thomas Norfleet, born Abt. 1717.

24 iv. John Norfleet, born Abt. 1719; died 1746 in Perquimans County NC. He married Sarah Abt. 1741 in Perquimans County NC; born Abt. 1721; died Aft. 1761.

25 v. Magaret Norfleet, born Abt. 1721.

26 vi. Philishia Norfleet, born Abt. 1728; died Abt. 1780. She met Unknown

8. Marmaduke3 Norfleet (Thomas2, Thomas1 Northfleete) was born 1700 in Nansemond County VA, and died 1774 in Northampton County NC. He married (1) Elizabeth Gordon Abt. 1727, daughter of John Gordon and Unknown. She was born Abt. 1706, and died Abt. 1743. He married (2) Judith Rhodes Abt. 1745.

Notes for Marmaduke Norfleet:

MARMADUKE NORFLEET (1700-1774)

Marmaduke, son of Thomas Norfleet Jr., was probably also a grandson of the first Norfleet immigrant, Thomas Northfleete. "Marmaduke" is an English North Country name, primarily found in the Yorkshire area; the name would not ordinarily be used by people, such as the Norfleets, who were from the southern County of Kent. However, Marmaduke's mother, according to Norfleet family researcher, W. A. Graham Clark, was named Mary Marmaduke, hence the source of his Christian name.

He was a very successful planter and land speculator. He patented or purchased many tracts of land in several counties of the Albermarle Region of North Carolina. Marmaduke represented Perquimans County in the North Carolina General Assembly from 1731 to 1742. He was appointed Justice of the Peace for Perquimans County in 1735. In 1766, he sold his principal plantation in Perquimans (1093 acres) to George Washington and Fielding Lewis. Washington had visited the area in 1763 and had been much impressed with the land in this region. After the sale, Marmaduke supplied wheat, oats, beef and corn for the slaves which Washington had sent to work the land he had just acquired. Marmaduke subsequently moved to Northampton County where he purchased from Thomas and Priscilla Hunter, by indenture dated 27 December 1766, a total of 535 acres of land called Rich Square. Marmaduke established a trading center there consisting of a general store, a blacksmith shop, and a grist mill.

WIVES

Marmaduke was married twice: first, to Elizabeth Gordon by whom he had two sons (Marmaduke, Jr. and Reuben), and, second, to Judith Rhoades by whom he had two daughters (Sarah and Judith).

MENTION OF MARMADUKE NORFLEET IN LETTERS OF GEORGE WASHINGTON

Marmaduke Norfleet was mentioned, many years after his death, in two letters of George Washington written in 1794. These letters are transcribed as follows:

1. Letter from George Washington to John Cowper, March 9, 1794

From: The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.--vol. 33

Philadelphia, March 9, 1794.

Sir: After waiting several months from the time your bond, dated the 18 of May 1791, for 146.13.4. became due, to see if (without reminding you thereof) you would make payment, I hardly expected, when application was made, to learn that I was yet to wait many months more for the money. As this, however, is the case, and you ask," whether I chuse the payment to be made in Philadelphia, should you be as late as the last of June next in making it," my answer, and wish is, that this may be the case, unless you have other advice from me in the meanwhile.

I never heard, before the receipt of your letter, of the claim of Jethro Ballard Esq: to any part of the land [Note 14] which was bought of Mr. Marmaduke Norfleet; nor can I easily conceive that such a claim is founded in equity. For I recollect well that all the disputable part of it, which was known to him, was given up. My opinion therefore is, that before any more of it is relinquished, he, or his heirs ought to be consulted; as they are certainly liable for any loss that may be sustained.

[Note 14: In Dismal Swamp.]

It appears a little extraordinary, that a claim of this sort should not have been known by Mr. Norfleet; nor by Colo. Lewis and myself, whilst we had possession of the plantation, was shewn, and always viewed the contested spot as part of the premises, if Mr. Ballard was the proprietor thereof in virtue of an elder patent, especially as I am very confident the lines and corners comprehending it, were ascertained to us by Mr. Norfleet at the moment he announced a dispute in another part, which, as I have before mentioned, was given up with his consent, rather than embark in a contest.

It is, however, the business of Mr. Jno. Lewis (from whom you purchased the land or rather with whom you made the agreement) to examine into this matter; for I have not time, nor will my situation allow me to do it, and further because the land was disposed of contrary to my judgment, and given into, merely to accommodate the demands on his father's Estate. I am etc. [Note15]

[Note 15: From the "Letter Book" copy in the Washington Papers.]

2. Letter from George Washington to John Lewis, September 8, 1794

From: The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.--vol. 33

Philadelphia, September 8, 1794.

Dear Sir: The enclosures of letters from me to Mr. John Cowper, and from him to me, &ca. occasioned by his Bond to you, assigned to me; will shew you that it was not until tuesday last that I received any part of the contents of the said Bond; and his reason for not discharging the whole of it.

To hold the bond any longer, under these circumstances, would be nugatory; as he means, I perceive, to delay paymt. of it until a final settlement for the land, takes place; and for a variety of reasons this settlement cannot be adjusted with me; amongst others, because I am unacquainted with the agreement you entered into, but principally if it was, my situation and public duties would render it impracticable for me to attend to this business.

I therefore return the Bond to you, that whatever may be due thereon at the final settlement, may be received and carried to the credit of our joint concern. In the mean while, that concern will have credit for Two hundred and two pounds six shillings and five pence half paymt. received Octr. 6th. 1792. and One hundred and forty pounds recd. from Mr. Cowper the fourth instant.

Mr. Cowper, as you will perceive, is very desirous of having this matter settled; nor ought it to be less desirable on our account; for delay will work more against us, than him. Let me beseech you therefore to take prompt and efficatious measures to bring the business to an end. One or two claims, of wch. I never had any knowledge or even suspicion, have already appeared; and others may start up, if the matter lyes open any longer.

I am perfectly satisfied that we aught not to lose any thing on account of any claim set up since the purchase of old Marmaduke Norfleet, and not known at the time of this purchase; at least that the heirs to that Gentleman are liable for all discoveries; but whatever you shall do after a full investigation, advice, and consideration, with respect to such claim or claims, I will abide by.

So soon as you shall have brought this business to a close, be so good as to transmit a state of it to me. I am etc.

 

 

 

 

 

Children of Marmaduke Norfleet and Elizabeth Gordon are:

27 i. Reuben4 Norfleet, born 25 January 1729/30 in Perquimans County NC; died May 1801 in Bertie County NC. He married (1) Lucy Penelope Smith 1765; born 17 October 1746; died Abt. 1771. He married (2) Mary Figures Abt. 1772

Notes for Reuben Norfleet:

REUBEN NORFLEET (1730-1801)

At least one descendant of Reuben Norfleet of Bertie County, North Carolina has been able to utilize the fact of his services, given to the patriot cause during the Revolution, to gain entry into the DAR. Reuben was the second son of the elder Marmaduke Norfleet (1700-1774) of Perquimans and Northampton Counties. Reuben Norfleet (1730-1801) was a wealthy planter who owned large tracts of land on both sides of the Roanoke River. During the Revolution he was a Justice of the Peace for Bertie County and a United States Postmaster.

It is said by some of his descendants that he was also a Captain in the North Carolina State Militia for Bertie County during the Revolution. However, I have not been able to find any documentary evidence supporting this claim. Earlier, during the French and Indian War, his military service was of a somewhat more dubious nature. In 1759, he was a private in Captain James McGirtt's Company in the North Carolina Militia Regiment commanded by Colonel Richard Richardson. Unfortunately the company muster list indicates that he deserted on 12 November 1759!

 

28 ii. Marmaduke Norfleet, born 1728 in Perquimans County NC; died Abt. 1760 in Edgecombe County NC. He married Name Unknown

Notes for Marmaduke Norfleet:

Marmaduke Norfleet, Junior (d. 1760)

Marmaduke, Jr. was the elder Marmaduke's oldest son; he married (wife's name unknown) and had two children, Absilla and Anne. Absilla married Benjamin Bell, a nephew of John Bell of Robertson County Tennessee, who was purportedly murdered by the infamous "Bell Witch" in December 1820..

 

Children of Marmaduke Norfleet and Judith Rhodes are:

29 i. Sarah4 Norfleet, born Abt. 1746; died Abt. 1830 in Franklin County NC. She married Simon Jeffreys Abt. 1774 in Northampton County NC; born Abt. 1744; died 11 October 1812 in Franklin County NC.

Notes for Sarah Norfleet:

SARAH NORFLEET (D. 1819)

Marmaduke's daughter , Sarah, married Simon Jeffreys a successful planter of Granville County, North Carolina.

 

Notes for Simon Jeffreys:

The following is an extract from the book "Marmaduke Norfleet Jeffreys, His Ancestors and Descendants" (published 1984), page 29:

"Simon ... was born about 1744 or 1745. Simon served with his brother William as a deputy sheriff in Bute County, North Carolina in 1768. His father, Osborne, was then the Sheriff of that county. Simon worked also with John Dent at surveying and was a chain carrier at time in 1778 and 1779. He was a representative from Franklin County to ... the General Assembly at the North Carolina Capital ... in 1783. Simon ... was primarily a planter.

"Simon Jeffreys married Sarah Norfleet of Northampton County. She was the daughter of Marmaduke Norfleet who had been one of the earliest settlers in Edgecombe County. Edgecombe County was divided and the Norfleets lived in the area which later became Northampton. We do not know the date of Sarah's birth. This couple were married before 1774 according to Marmaduke Norfleet's will. Simon died on 11 october 1812. Sarah died in late 1829 or early in 1830. Ten children were born to this couple."

 

 

30 ii. Judith Norfleet, born Abt. 1748 in Perquimans County NC; died 1811 in Gates County NC. She married William Baker Abt. 1768 in NC; born Abt. 1743 in Chowan County NC; died June 1805 in Gates County NC.

Notes for Judith Norfleet:

Marmaduke Norfleet's daughter Judith married William Baker, a wealthy Gates County planter and owner of Buckland Plantation. Judith was a devotee of Francis Asbury, first Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States. Bishop Asbury frequently stayed at Buckland when he was traveling in the Albermarle area.

JUDITH'S LETTER TO BISHOP ASBURY

William and Judith Norfleet Baker were early converts to Methodism. The famous itinerant preacher and the first Bishop of the Methodist Church in America, Francis Asbury (1745-1816), was a frequent visitor to their house when he was traveling in their vicinity. Knotty Pine Chapel, located near Buckland, was one of the earliest Methodist churches in North Carolina, and Asbury frequently preached there. On 17 March 1799, Judith Norfleet Baker wrote a letter to Bishop Asbury wherein she reported the names of people from the area who had converted to Methodism, but were now deceased. The first name she mentioned was Elizabeth Norfleet. I quote:

"When you were with me last, you desired I would give you an account of the dear saints who are fallen asleep in Jesus, in this place. I will give you a list of their names with a sketch of some of their characters.

"Elizabeth Norfleet, one of the first that embraced religion after the gospel was preached here; she was one of the meekest women, a pattern of piety to the end of her days"

I am quite certain that the Elizabeth Norfleet mentioned in Judith's letter was Elizabeth Riddick Norfleet, widow of John, who had died many years previously, in May 1781. Francis Asbury had first preached in the Nansemond County, Virginia and Gates County, North Carolina areas in the summer of 1780, hence it was probably in that year that Elizabeth Norfleet was converted.

 

Notes for William Baker:

WILLIAM BAKER OF BUCKLAND PLANTATION

Buckland Plantation lies a few miles west of the Corapeake area, where John Norfleet and his first Cousin, Marmaduke Norfleet, had their plantations. From about 1769 to1805, this plantation was owned by a certain William Baker (1743-1805). William was a grandson of Captain Henry Baker (d. 1739) and the son of "Lame Henry" Baker (d. 1769). In about the year 1768, this same William Baker had married Judith Norfleet, daughter of Marmaduke Norfleet (1700-1774). In 1795, William Baker built the great plantation house that is, today, known as "Buckland." The home is still standing and has been designated as a national historical landmark..

9. John3 Norfleet (John2, Thomas1 Northfleete) was born 21 July 1699 in Nansemond County VA, and died 26 September 1753 in Chowan County NC. He married Elizabeth Riddick 28 May 1727 in Nansemond County VA, daughter of Abraham Riddick and Elizabeth Pleasant. She was born 05 April 1710 in Nansemond County VA, and died 09 May 1781 in Gates County NC.

Notes for John Norfleet:

John, the son of John and Esther Norfleet, probably was a grandson of the original Norfleet immigrant, Thomas Northfleete (c. 1645 - c. 1700). Due to the loss of virtually all Nansemond County records dating to before the Civil War period, very little information is available re this family while living in Virginia. From John's Bible record, we do know that, in 1727, he married Elizabeth Riddick (1710-1781), a member of a very socially prominent Nansemond County family. John Norfleet was a successful planter in Nansemond County, Virginia; he was a Justice of the Peace for Nansemond County and a member of the Vestry for the Upper Parish of Nansemond for a number of years.

In 1740, John Norfleet patented 633 acres of land in Chowan County, North Carolina, near Corapeak Swamp, and established a grist/saw mill on the site. The North Carolina land was very near the plantation of his first cousin, Marmaduke Norfleet (1700-1774). For several years, he continued to also own land in Nansemond County and was referred to, in the 1747 land processioning notes contained in the Upper Parish Vestry Book, as "John Norfleet at the mill." After 1747, he ceased active participation in the Nansemond Vestry but, apparently, he never formally resigned. After John's death in 1753, his widow, Elizabeth, with the help of her children, took over management of the mill. In 1779, that part of Chowan County where John Norfleet had lived became part of the newly formed County of Gates. John's widow, Elizabeth Riddick Norfleet, died on 9 May 1781.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BUYS NORFLEET SWAMP LAND

On 15 October 1763, George Washington passed through the Corapeak area and made the following annotation in his diary:

"The main swamp of Oropeake is about a mile onwards from this, where stands the Widow Norfleet's Mill and Luke Sumner's plantations At the mouth of this swamp is a very large meadow of 2 or 3000 acres held by Sumner, Widow Norfleet, Marmaduke Norfleet, Powell and others and valuable ground it is."

 

The "Widow Norfleet" mentioned by Washington was, of course, Elizabeth Riddick Norfleet.

Washington was quite serious with respect to his interest in this "valuable ground." By indenture, dated 25 April 1766, Washington and his brother-in law, Fielding Lewis, acquired Cousin Marmaduke's Corapeak plantation of 1093 acres. After the sale, Marmaduke supplied wheat, oats, beef and corn for the slaves which Washington had sent to work the land he had just acquired. Marmaduke subsequently moved to Northampton County where he purchased from Thomas and Priscilla Hunter, by indenture dated 27 December 1766, a total of 535 acres of land called Rich Square. There, Marmaduke established a trading center consisting of a general store, a blacksmith shop, and a grist mill.

NORFLEET'S MILL

In the Revolutionary War, during October and November 1780, John Norfleet's old grist mill, then called "Norfleet's Mill," was the encampment site for North Carolina militia forces commanded by General Thomas Benbury, who were opposing a British force then operating in the Suffolk and South Quay areas of Nansemond County.

Bible Record of John and Elizabeth Norfleet

 

John Norfleet (1699-1753) and Elizabeth Riddick (1710-1781) had twelve children of whom six (6) sons and five (5) daughters survived into adulthood. Primarily as the result of pioneering genealogical work by Fillmore Norfleet (1903-1987), the identities of the eleven surviving children were disclosed. In a letter, dated 10 September 1942, to Nettie Hale Rand of Saint Louis Missouri, the author of Rand-Hale Strong and Allied Families, A Genealogical Study with the Autobiography of Nettie Hale Rand (New York: 1940), Fillmore Norfleet states that:

" A decade ago a man employed in dismantling a barn on the Elisha Rawls farm near Box Elder, Virginia, found, after he had torn the roofing away from one corner of the house, a Bible with one weathered page containing the birth and death dates of the family of John Norfleet. The Elisha Rawls farm had belonged formerly to John A. Norfleet, and before him, to his father, Abram Norfleet (1774-1827). The Bible was given to Edward Alston Norfleet, and at his death passed to Mrs. John E. Martin (Virginia Jenkins), granddaughter of Wilson Norfleet. It has remained in her possession, but she refuses to let me or anyone else have an expert bring out the vanished names beside the birth dates."

The "Abraham Norfleet (1774-1827)" referred to by Fillmore was the brother (see page 65) of David and James Norfleet of Kentucky. At the present time (1996), I have no information as to whom has possession of this Bible; however, per Filmore Norfleet, the fragmentary records from the bible provided the following information:

 

_____ Norfleet, son of John Norfleet and his wife, was born 21 Jul 1699

Elizabeth Riddick, daughter of Abraham and Pleasant Riddick, was born 5 Apr 1710

John Norfleet and Elizabeth Riddick were married 28 May 1727

Children of John Norfleet and Elizabeth Riddick:

1. Abraham Norfleet was born 28 May 1728

2. _____ Norfleet was born 30 Oct 1729

3. Pleasant Norfleet was born 14 Aug 1732

4. _____ Norfleet was born 18 Mar 1734

5. Esther Norfleet was born 13 Jan 1736

6. _____ Norfleet was born 30 Jun 1737

7. _____ Norfleet was born 30 May 1739

8. _____ Norfleet was born 19 May 1741

9. _____ Norfleet was born 17 Aug 1743

10. _____ Norfleet was born 06 Oct 1745

11. _____ Norfleet was born 23 Aug 1747

12. _____ Norfleet was born 28 Mar 1751

The surviving Bible record, set forth above, provides the names of only three of the twelve children. However, the research of Fillmore Norfleet and Clairborn T. Smith, Jr. (then of Rocky Mount, North Carolina) conducted during the 1940's primarily among the land records and court administration papers of Gates County, North Carolina, identified the names of eight of the other nine children (see below).

Also, an order of the Gates County, North Carolina Court, dated 12 February 1786, provides for the final division of the remaining monetary portion of the estate of John and Elizabeth Norfleet (see Appendix F, Illustration 7) among the eleven surviving children and lists their names (six sons and five daughters) as follows:

Abraham Norfleet

John Norfleet

James Norfleet

Hezakiah Norfleet

Elisha Norfleet

Jacob Norfleet

Pleasant Twine

Esther Winborn

Elizabeth Norfleet (probably "Elizabeth Ann" aka "Nancy", who married John Baker)

Barsheba Gordon

Mary Ellis

We know from the bible record that Abraham was the oldest son and that Pleasant was the oldest daughter named, with Esther being the second eldest daughter named. If we assume that the list is in order of sex and age, then John Norfleet would be the second born son (born 30 October 1729).

Since Abraham is clearly the first born son, we have an example of a deviation from the normal Southern English and Virginia custom of naming the first borne son and daughter after the paternal Grandparents. In this case, the first born son is apparently named after the maternal Grandfather, Abraham Riddick. Also the eldest daughter, Pleasant, is apparently named after the maternal Grandmother, Pleasant Riddick. I'm not sure why this naming procedure was followed, but it may be the result of giving deference to the Riddick family, as the Riddicks were probably the most socially prominent family in the Upper Parish of Nansemond County at that time.

Apparently, in this case, the paternal Grandparents names were used for the second born son and daughter. Thus, I am confident that John was the second eldest son. Also, information possessed by the descendants of Barsheba (nee Norfleet) Gordon indicates that the mother of John Norfleet of Chowan was named Esther. The second oldest daughter of John (d. 1753) was also named Esther. These facts fit the above described naming strategy perfectly!

LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF JOHN NORFLEET

The last will and testament of John Norfleet (1699-1753), dated 10 September 1753, was probated in Chowan County, North Carolina in April 1754. The essential elements of the will are transcribed as follows:

" I dispose thereof as follows: first I give to my son Abraham Norfleet All the Land and Plantation That I bought of Henry Syles, Lieing on Bockahock [sic} Creek to him his Heirs and Assignees for ever.

"Item. I give to my said son Abraham Two Red Pide [sic] Stears about five Year Old. Also, I give to my said son Abraham five Sheep to wit one Ram and four Ewes.

"Item. I give to my loving Wife Elisabeth Norfleet The Plantation whereon I now Live with all my Lands thereunto belonging. Also, my Grist Mill and the Land belonging thereunto, together with my Island and all the mearsh [sic] & Land thereunto belonging. To Hold to Her during her Widowhood.

"Item. I give the use of all my Negroes and other Estate of what Nature and Kind so ever not before given to my Wife Elisabeth Norfleet During her Widowhood. Item. I give the Houses Plantation and all the Lands there unto belonging, after my Wifes deceas to my son Jacob Norfleet and to his heirs and Assignees for ever.

"Item. I give my Island and Marsh being Three hundred and Sixteen and a half acres After my Wifes Deseas. to be Equally Divided amongst all my Children Sons and Daughters. but my son John to have his first Choice. To them their Heirs and Assignees for ever. But that neither of them shall sell or Assign their Part thereof unless it be to a Brother or Sister. And if my Wife should Happen to Marry again after my Death then my will and desire is that my Grist Mill and the Land there unto Belonging and also my Copper Still shall be sold at Publick Sale to the Highest Bidder for Ready money after my wifes Deceas or Marriage. And Out of The Money so arising and the Residue of my Personal Estate I give to Each and Every one of my Children Except my Son Abraham The sum of Twenty five Pounds Virginia Money. And a good Feather Bed to Each Except my son Abraham and my Daughter Pleasant who have already received theirs. And if my Estate after the Still, mill, and Negroes are sold at Publick Sale to the highest bidders, amounts to more money; then my will and desire is that the remainder be equally Divided amongst all my children without Exception. I mean share and share alike and

"Lastly I make and ordain my Loving Wife Elisabeth Norfleet Executrix and my son John Norfleet and my son James Norfleet Executors To this my Last Will and Testament "

Particular note should be made of the provisions in the will for the division of John Norfleet's "Island and Marsh" consisting of 316 and 1/2 acres, among all his sons and daughters. After John's wife Elizabeth died in 1781, this tract was divided among the eleven surviving children. Most of the children almost immediately sold their shares to others. It was through the analysis of these land sale records, located in Gates County, that Fillmore Norfleet and Clairborn T. Smith were able to obtain the names of John's sons and daughters as well as the names of many of the spouses.

 

Notes for Elizabeth Riddick:

BISHOP ASBURY AND ELIZABETH NORFLEET

Buckland Plantation lies a few miles west of the Corapeake area, where John Norfleet and his first Cousin, Marmaduke Norfleet, had their plantations. From about 1769 to1805, this plantation was owned by a certain William Baker (1743-1805). William was a grandson of Captain Henry Baker (d. 1739) and the son of "Lame Henry" Baker (d. 1769). In about the year 1768, this same William Baker had married Judith Norfleet, daughter of Marmaduke Norfleet (1700-1774). In 1795, William Baker built the great plantation house that is, today, known as "Buckland." The home is still standing and has been designated as a national historical landmark.

William and Judith Norfleet Baker were early converts to Methodism. The famous itinerant preacher and the first Bishop of the Methodist Church in America, Francis Asbury (1745-1816), was a frequent visitor to their house when he was traveling in their vicinity. Knotty Pine Chapel, located near Buckland, was one of the earliest Methodist churches in North Carolina, and Asbury frequently preached there. On 17 March 1799, Judith Norfleet Baker wrote a letter to Bishop Asbury wherein she reported the names of people from the area who had converted to Methodism, but were now deceased. The first name she mentioned was Elizabeth Norfleet. I quote:

"When you were with me last, you desired I would give you an account of the dear saints who are fallen asleep in Jesus, in this place. I will give you a list of their names with a sketch of some of their characters.

"Elizabeth Norfleet, one of the first that embraced religion after the gospel was preached here; she was one of the meekest women, a pattern of piety to the end of her days"

I am quite certain that the Elizabeth Norfleet mentioned in Judith's letter was Elizabeth Riddick Norfleet, widow of John, who had died many years previously, in May 1781. Francis Asbury had first preached in the Nansemond County, Virginia and Gates County, North Carolina areas in the summer of 1780, hence it was probably in that year that Elizabeth Norfleet was converted.

 

Children of John Norfleet and Elizabeth Riddick are:

31 i. Abraham4 Norfleet, born 28 May 1728 in Nansemond County VA; died May 1785 in Chowan County NC. He married Sarah Lewis Abt. 1749 in Chowan County NC; born Abt. 1730 in Unknown; died Aft. 1784 in Chowan County NC.

Notes for Abraham Norfleet:

John and Elizabeth Norfleet's oldest son, Abraham, was born on 28 August 1728. He was the Clerk of the Vestry for St. Paul's Parish in Chowan County, North Carolina for many years. Abraham's wife was Sarah Lewis by whom he appears to have had at least seven and perhaps eight children. Abraham's will, dated 25 October 1784, with memorandum of errata dated 3 May 1785, was probated in the Gates County Court on 27 June 1785. The will mentions four sons (Abraham, Elisha, Benjamin and Isaac) and three daughters (Mary, Elizabeth and Sarah). His sons, Benjamin and Isaac, were merchants, operating stores in the Hertford, Bertie and Edgecombe County areas of North Carolina. Abraham was a farmer who resided in the Gates County/Chowan County area for the rest of his life. Mary married Jeremiah Freeman. I have no further information concerning Elizabeth and Sarah. A possible fourth daughter, Cora Norfleet, is named by the NC genealogist, J. R. B. Hathaway, to have participated in the "Edenton Tea Party;" however, I have been unable to find any evidence supporting this assertion.

32 ii. John Norfleet, born 30 October 1729 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1812 in Nansemond County VA. He married Judith Holland Abt. 1759 in Nansemond County VA; born Abt. 1740 in Nansemond County VA; died Bef. 1812 in Nansemond County VA.

Notes for John Norfleet:

I believe that James and David Norfleet of Pulaski County, Kentucky were the sons of John Norfleet (1729-1812) and Judath (modern spelling - Judith) Holland of Nansemond County), Virginia. The relationship of David with John Norfleet (1729-1812) is established from an indenture, dated 26 April 1813, recorded in Pulaski County, Kentucky wherein David conveys 170 acres of land, which is located in Nansemond County, Virginia, to Abraham Norfleet also of Nansemond County, the land being a tract "... whereon John Norfleet, deceased, had lived (Father to said David) ..." The indenture describes the location of the land as bordering on the lands of John Porter and Jacob Holland and near the Summerton Swamp and a mill dam.

The Nansemond County land tax lists for the years 1806-1811 show only one property owner with the name of John Norfleet. The land tax list for 1812 shows this same property as being "John Norfleet Srs Est", thus indicating that John had died during the 1812 time period. This John Norfleet had operated a grist mill near what is now called Holland Village and also near the old Summerton Swamp. Indeed, in the modern City of Suffolk (which incorporated all of Nansemond County in 1974), there is still an old mill pond called "Norfleet Pond." Accordingly, this John Norfleet Sr. is undoubtedly the same person mentioned in David Norfleet's indenture and is the Norfleet who originally owned "Norfleet's Pond."

John Norfleet's wife, Judath (Judith), was probably the daughter of Henry Holland (see page 61 of this book for Henry's genealogical sketch). Judath's name is revealed by a Gates County, North Carolina indenture (see Deed Book 1, Page 189), dated 13 January 1786, whereby:

" John Norfleet and Judah his wife of Nansemond County in the State of Virginia of the one part and Jacob Gordon of the other part in the State of North Carolina in Gates County Witnesseth that said John Norfleet & Judath his wife "

The indenture conveys a 20 acre tract of land in the "Island' at White Oak Spring Marsh of Gates County North Carolina, being John Norfleet's share (tenth lot) of the division of the estate of John and Elizabeth Norfleet, deceased. Judath signed the indenture as "Judath Norfleet."

Due to the loss (by fire) of virtually all the Nansemond County records before the Civil War there is very little information available regarding this family. However the few bits of information which I have been able to glean are presented in the paragraphs below.

The Vestry Book of the Upper Parish of Nansemond County indicates that, during the years 1758-1759, John Norfleet provided the land and built the Anglican Chapel located near Cypress Swamp in the Upper Parish of Nansemond County. The chapel was a frame building standing on the south bank of Cypress Swamp, a mile west of the Great Dismal Swamp. The site now lies on a side road leading east from Virginia Route 10, about 8 miles south of the downtown area of the City of Suffolk. By an order of the Vestry in the year 1760, the parish minister was ordered to preach at Cypress Chapel four times a year. The chapel appears to have remained in service at least through the year 1793, the last year that the Upper Parish Vestry minutes were kept. For many years, John's younger brother, Hezekiah Norfleet, was a "Reader" at this chapel.

 

A petition to the Virginia State Legislature in 1781 (see the Virginia Genealogist, Volume 18, Number 3, Pages 207-208), states:

" Petition of the Justices of the Peace of Nansemond County lately constituting a Court of Oyer on the trial of Will, a Negro man slave the property of Henry Skinner, Mingo a slave of Josiah Riddick, deceased, Harry a slave of John Giles and Isaac a slave of Abraham Ballard, found guilty of entering the dwelling houses of Isaac Lasseter and John Norfleet and taking money and other goods. They ask pardon since the slaves were induced to commit the robbery by Henry Skinner and Joseph Sketo."

 

The above cited John Norfleet must be the same John Norfleet, father of David and James, who died about the year 1812. The extant Nansemond County land tax lists for the years 1782-1798 show this John Norfleet listed as a property owner in the Upper Parish with 200 acres. From 1799-1811, this same John is shown with land totaling 142 acres. The land tax list for 1812 shows the same 142 acre property as being "John Norfleet Srs Est", thus indicating that John had died during the 1811-1812 time period.

 

John Norfleet (1729-1812), like his father, appears to have operated a grist mill near what is now called Holland Village and also near the old Summerton Swamp. Indeed, in the modern City of Suffolk (which incorporated all of Nansemond County in 1974), there is still an old mill pond called "Norfleet's Pond." This gristmill may be the same mill that Job Holland acquired from Henry Norfleet in 1804.

 

33 iii. Pleasant Norfleet, born 14 August 1732 in Nansemond County VA. She married John Twine; died Abt. 1784 in Perquimans County NC.

Notes for Pleasant Norfleet:

The oldest daughter of John Norfleet, Pleasant was born on 14 August 1732. She married John Twine of Perquimans County, North Carolina. John Twine's will, dated 13 May 1781 and probated 24 April 1784, mentions his wife Pleasant; daughter Elizabeth Perry; and sons Jesse, Aaron, John, Elisha and Thomas Twine. Jacob Gordon, Jesse Twine and Abraham Twine were named as executors.

34 iv. James Norfleet, born 18 March 1733/34 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1780 in Nansemond County VA. He married Mary Battle Abt. 1761 in Nansemond County VA; born Abt. 1740 in Nansemond County VA; died Aft. 1811 in Northampton County NC.

Notes for James Norfleet:

James, the third born son of John Norfleet of Chowan, was born in Nansemond County on 18 March 1734/1735. About the year 1761 he married Mary Battle, daughter of John Battle and Sarah Brown.

A nephew of Mary Battle Norfleet, William Sumner Battle, writing in about the year 1820, had this to say about Mary Battle and James Norfleet:

"John [Battle] (who is my grandfather) married Sarah, daughter of the said Dr. John Brown, by whom he had five children Mary who married James Norfleet by whom she had several children, but I now recollect only the name of Sally, whose first husband was Elias Hilliard and second Col. William Horn. And Martha who married Isaac Dortch and moved to the state of Tennessee, after the death of Mr. Norfleet the widow married Samuel Lawrence "

I agree with this statement, with one exception; review of the tax lists and land records of Northampton County, North Carolina lead me to believe that Mary Norfleet (nee Battle), after the death of James Norfleet, married Lemuel not Samuel Lawrence. The William Sumner Battle account, cited above, is the published version as found in the "Battle Book." Mr. Battle's original hand-written document has been lost. Thus, it is possible that the name "Samuel" is a misreading of the word "Lemuel." These names are almost indistinguishable in the cursive handwriting of the 18th and early 19th centuries; hence, it is not uncommon for some published records to erroneously refer to Lemuel as Samuel.

On 23 May 1763, James Norfleet patented 537 acres of land in the Upper Parish of Nansemond County (Land Processioning Precinct 11). The patent indicates that the land was in the fork of Summerton Creek and the Blackwater River and included 132 acres formerly granted unto Thomas Lawrence (1714), and 150 acres formerly granted (1731) unto Abraham Riddick (probably James's maternal grandfather).

James seems to have died circa 1780. This is implied because his brother John Norfleet (1729-1812), along with James was an executor of the estate of their father John Norfleet (1699-1753). In a listing of expenses incurred re the administration of the estate, John Norfleet (1729-1812) makes the following entry, dated May 1780:

" To going after the smiths tools at James Norfleet's, decd & delivering them to said Mother "

The "Mother" so indicated was Elizabeth (nee Riddick) Norfleet, the mother of both James (d. 1780) and John. (d. 1812).

Shortly after her first husband's death, Mary Battle Norfleet, married Lemuel Lawrence and relocated to Northampton County, North Carolina. Lemuel apparently died in 1811; his will, dated 14 January 1809, was probated in Northampton County in June 1811. The will makes reference to his wife Mary, his son Jonas and his daughter Polly Cross (wife of Jesse R. Cross).

James Norfleet and Mary Battle had six children: four sons (John, James, William and Cordall) and two daughters (Sarah and Martha Ann). Four of these children, James (better known as Major James), William, Cordall and Martha Ann were early settlers in Middle Tennessee; Major James Norfleet was probably the first, having arrived in Davidson County late in the year 1789.

 

35 v. Esther Norfleet, born 13 January 1735/36 in Nansemond County VA. She married James Winbourn; born in Nansemond County VA.

36 vi. Name Unknown - Died Young, born 30 June 1737.

37 vii. Hezakiah Norfleet, born 30 May 1739 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1811. He married Mary Bef. 1779 in Nansemond County VA

Notes for Hezakiah Norfleet:

Hezekiah was probably born on 30 May 1739 and thus was the fourth oldest son of John Norfleet. He moved back to Nansemond County and, according to the county land tax lists, acquired 436 acres of land near the Anglican Chapel at Cypress Swamp. The Upper Parish Vestry Book indicates that he was the Reader at Cypress Chapel for several years. The Nansemond County land tax lists indicate that Hezekiah had at least one son named John. The tax lists also indicate that Hezekiah died in about the year 1811.

38 viii. Elisha Norfleet, born 19 May 1741; died in Gates County NC.

Notes for Elisha Norfleet:

Elisha was probably born on 19 May 1741. He thus was the fifth oldest son of John Norfleet. He lived in Gates County, North Carolina where, according to the county land tax lists, he owned a small 80-acre farm. He never married. On 1 October 1798, he deeded all his slaves and household furniture to his nephew Kinchen Norfleet (the son of Jacob Norfleet). Elisha probably died in late 1798 or early 1799 as his name does not appear on the Gates County tax list for 1799.

39 ix. Jacob Norfleet, born 17 August 1743; died Bef. August 1780 in Gates County NC. He married Elizabeth Kinchen(?)

Notes for Jacob Norfleet:

John Norfleet's youngest son, Jacob, was probably born on 17 August 1743. He was a constable for Chowan County in the 1770's. He lived near the land and mill of his father and mother, in that portion of Chowan that in 1779 became part of the newly formed County of Gates. Jacob died as a comparatively young man in about the year 1780.

40 x. Barsheba Norfleet, born 06 September 1745; died 08 July 1825 in Gates County NC. She married Jacob Gordon 14 May 1769; born 1744; died 20 July 1819 in Gates County NC.

Notes for Barsheba Norfleet:

Probably the third oldest daughter of John Norfleet, Barsheba was born on 6 September 1745 and died 8 July 1825. She married Jacob Gordon on 14 May 1769. Jacob was the son of John Gordon and Mary Hunter. Two sisters of John Gordon, Mary and Elizabeth, also married members of the Norfleet family: James Norfleet (d. 1732) of Perquimans County and Marmaduke Norfleet (1700-1774) of Northampton County, North Carolina, respectively. Also, a daughter of John Gordon and Mary Hunter, Sarah Gordon, married James Norfleet (d. 1796) of Gates County, North Carolina. This James Norfleet was the grandson of the elder James (d.1732) of Perquimans. All three of these Norfleet males were descendents of Thomas Norfleet, Junior, the son of the original Norfleet immigrant, Thomas Northfleete (c. 1645 - c. 1700.

41 xi. Mary Norfleet, born 23 August 1747. She married John Ellis; died Abt. 1811.

Notes for Mary Norfleet:

Mary was probably born on 23 August 1747 and was the fourth oldest daughter of John Norfleet. She married John Ellis of Gates County, North Carolina. The will of John Ellis, dated 8 November 1810 and probated in 1811, mentions his wife Mary, his son Marmaduke Norfleet Ellis and his daughters Elizabeth Riddick Ellis and Sarah Norfleet Ellis.

42 xii. Elizabeth Ann (Nancy) Norfleet, born 28 March 1751 in Chowan County NC; died Abt. September 1831 in Montgomery County TN. She married John Baker Abt. 1785 in Gates County NC; born Abt. 1753 in Bertie County VA; died 22 December 1829 in Montgomery County TN.

Notes for Elizabeth Ann (Nancy) Norfleet:

John Norfleet's daughter Elizabeth Ann (Nancy) was probably his youngest child and, thus, was born on 28 march 1751. Possibly to avoid confusion between her and her mother, Elizabeth Riddick Norfleet, she appears to have been usually known by her middle name, Ann or Nancy. In about 1785, Ann married the successful planter, John Baker, of Hertford and Gates County North Carolina. John Baker was a grandson of Captain Henry Baker (d. 1739) and a half-first cousin of William Baker of Buckland Plantation, who had married Judith Norfleet, daughter of Marmaduke Norfleet (1700-1774). Thus, we have a situation where Baker first cousins, John and William Baker, married Norfleet second cousins, Ann (Nancy) and Judith Norfleet!

John and Nancy Baker moved to Robertson County, Tennessee in 1796. One of their sons, William, fought in the War of 1812, dying in 1815 at the Battle of New Orleans. In 1802, their daughter Lucinda married Willie Blount, who subsequently became the Governor of the State of Tennessee. A daughter of Willie and Lucinda Blount, also named Lucinda, married a son of Isaac and Martha (nee Norfleet) Dortch, i. e., John Baker Dortch. Martha Norfleet Dortch was a daughter of James Norfleet (1735-1780) of Nansemond County, Virginia; thus she was a niece of Elizabeth Ann Norfleet Baker.

.

10. Joseph3 Norfleet (John2, Thomas1 Northfleete) was born Abt. 1705 in Nansemond County VA, and died Abt. 1756 in Nansemond County VA. He married Elizabeth _____ Abt. 1729 in Nansemond County VA. She was born Abt. 1709 in Nansemond County VA, and died Abt. 1772 in Nansemond County VA.

 

Children of Joseph Norfleet and Elizabeth _____ are:

43 i. Cordall4 Norfleet, born Abt. 1735 in Nansemond County VA; died 1788 in Southampton County VA. He met (1) Ann Bynum He married (2) Mary Wilkerson 1771 in Southampton County VA; born Abt. 1750 in VA; died 09 November 1819 in Southampton County VA.

Notes for Cordall Norfleet:

Cordall Norfleet was the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Norfleet of Nansemond County. His father, Joseph, was the tobacco inspector (appointed in 1733) at Lawrence's Warehouse; this warehouse was located on the site where the town of Suffolk was later established in 1742. The position of Inspector of Tobacco was a potentially very lucrative post and was much sought after by members of the Virginia Gentry. Joseph held land in both Nansemond and Isle of Wight Counties. In 1737, Joseph acquired a 185 acre tract of land in the Nottaway Parish of Isle of Wight County. In 1749, the County of Southampton was formed and the land fell within the new county. This tract formed the nucleus of the plantation that Joseph's son, Cordall, would later create. By the time of his death in 1788, Cordall's plantation in Southampton County had grown to 1400 acres.

Cordall was the first Norfleet to establish his primary residence in Southampton County. He apparently moved to Southampton in about 1756 for, in that year, he patented an additional 200 acres of land adjacent to that of his father, Joseph (then deceased). Cordall most certainly was a resident by 1760; he was appointed ensign in the Southampton Militia in that year by the Royal Governor of Virginia, Francis Fauquier.

As a royal officer in the militia, he would have been required to take the Test Oath, the Oath of Abjuration and two Oaths of Allegiance to the King (see page 47). Having previously taken these oaths, when the Revolution began, Cordall, like George Washington, may have had some hesitation before embracing the patriot cause.

CORDALL'S ILLEGITIMATE SON

Cordall appears to have been somewhat of a "womanizer" in his younger days. On 14 March 1760, he was ordered by the Justices of Southampton County to post a bastardy bond for a child he sired by a woman named Ann Bynum. The child was apparently named Cordall Norfleet Bynum. In his will (probated 1788), Cordall Norfleet left Cordall N. Bynum a 694-acre plantation in Northampton County, North Carolina; this legacy constituted almost one-third of Cordall's entire estate!

MARRIAGE TO MARY WILKERSON

In July 1771, Cordall married Mary Wilkinson, by whom he had five (5) children; only three survived into adulthood, Elizabeth, John and Sarah. Cordall was a successful planter; at the time of his death in 1788, he had accumulated 1400 acres of land in Southampton County, Virginia, 694 acres of land in Northampton County, North Carolina and owned about 28 slaves.

REVOLUTIONARY WAR PARTICIPATION

At the time of the Revolution, Cordall Norfleet was a wealthy planter of Southampton County Virginia. His political position during the early days of the Revolutionary War may have been somewhat equivocal. The minutes of the Committee of Safety for Southampton County, for 11 January 1776, makes the following reference to Cordall:

"Ordered that Mr. Wm Blunt & Mr. Jno Thomas Blow wait on Mr. Jno Wilkinson & Mr. Cordall Norfleet & take security that they do not sell any pork that may be barreled by them without permission of this committee."

The Committees of Safety were the de facto local governing bodies at the county level in Revolutionary Virginia, entirely replacing the royal governing structures such as the parish vestries. The committee order cited above is equivocal, but the implication is that messieurs Wilkinson and Norfleet may have been considered less than sanguine regarding the patriot cause and therefore required watching by the Committee.

The above notwithstanding, after the Revolution, Cordall filed two War connected public service claims in Virginia for which he was reimbursed

LAWSUIT IN VA COURT OF APPEALS

Ten years after Cordall's death, his only legitimate male heir, John Norfleet died in 1798, shortly after having reached the age of 21. John's wife of only three months, Eve Formicula Norfleet (see below), renounced her rights to his estate for a "stipulated price." However, John's early death gave rise to a major lawsuit between his two sisters, Elizabeth and Sarah; and the children (William and Lavinia) of his mother, Mary Norfleet, by her second husband, William Gee. The case ultimately went to the Virginia Court of Appeals and the court decision (in October 1805) became a major precedent in the law concerning widow's dower. It is interesting to note that none of the parties contested the 694-acre legacy to Cordall Norfleet Bynum, hence his illegitimate status must have been well known to all members of the family!

AARON NORFLEET AND THE NAT TURNER REVOLT

Cordall Norfleet may also have sired a child (Aaron Norfleet) by a slave woman, in about the year 1756. On 28 May 1798, Aaron was freed by Cordall's legitimate male heir, John Norfleet. After gaining his freedom, Aaron acquired land on the south side of Flat Swamp and lived there for many years. In March 1808, Aaron married Marian Artis. Marian belonged to the large and well-known Artis family of free blacks, who mostly lived in the St. Luke's Parish area of Southampton County. Aaron apparently died in October 1831, under rather suspicious circumstances. Aaron's death occurred shortly after the Nat Turner Revolt (August 1831), but before Turner was apprehended and hung in November 1831. Aaron's farm was located less than 2 miles from the farm of Joseph Travis, where Nat Turner had lived. In addition, several members of his wife's family had participated in the Turner insurrection. It was widely believed by the local white people that Turner had been aided in the planning for his "revolt" by the local free Negroes, accordingly, Aaron would have been a prime suspect in this regard. During the time while Nat Turner was a fugitive, gangs of white vigilantes roamed throughout Southampton County, searching for Turner and seizing any free blacks they ran across, for questioning re Turner's whereabouts. Many of the free blacks so taken were tortured and sometimes killed. Aaron, who by this time was an elderly man, may have been the victim of such a "vigorous" interrogation!

 

44 ii. Joseph Norfleet, born Abt. 1745 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1789 in Nansemond County VA. He married Nancy _____ Abt. 1780; born Abt. 1755 in Nansemond County VA.

11. Christopher3 Norfleet (Christopher2, Thomas1 Northfleete) was born Abt. 1700 in Nansemond County VA, and died 1751. He married Unknown Abt. 1725.

 

Children of Christopher Norfleet and Unknown are:

45 i. Christopher4 Norfleet, born Abt. 1726; died Abt. 1780. He married Unknown Abt. 1754.

46 ii. Elisha Norfleet, born Abt. 1730.

47 iii. Samuel Norfleet, born Abt. 1732.

13. Edward3 Norfleet (Edward2, Thomas1 Northfleete) was born Abt. 1695 in Nansemond County VA, and died 1747 in Nansemond County VA. He married Rachael(?) _____ Abt. 1715 in Nansemond County VA.

 

Children of Edward Norfleet and Rachael(?) _____ are:

48 i. Rachael4 Norfleet, born Abt. 1718 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1770 in Norfolk County VA. She married Thomas Lewelling Abt. 1735 in VA Colony; born Abt. 1695; died 1758 in Norfolk County VA.

49 ii. Thomas Norfleet, born Abt. 1720 in Nansemond County VA; died 1777 in Nansemond County VA. He married (1) Name Unknown Abt. 1741 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1755 in Nansemond County VA. He married (2) Janetta Wilson Abt. 1758 in Nansemond County VA; born 1742 in Ayr County Scotland; died Abt. 1789 in Nansemond County VA.

50 iii. Edward Norfleet, born Abt. 1724 in Nansemond County VA; died Abt. 1774 in Nansemond County VA.

51 iv. John Norfleet, born Abt. 1726.

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